Georgia Tech names Health & Humanitarian Systems an official Interdisciplinary Research Center

Posted March 8, 2016 | Atlanta, GA

Georgia Institute of Technology recently designated the Center for Health & Humanitarian Systems (CHHS) as one of four new Phase I Interdisciplinary Research Centers (IRCs) on campus. Each of these centers brings together researchers from different disciplines across campus to address topics of strategic importance to Georgia Tech, promoting collaborative research and coordinating activities aimed at large external funding opportunities.

CHHS was founded in 2007 with the vision to serve as an academic engine for improve the delivery of health care, disaster response, and long-term development though advanced science and technology. The center has built an extensive program of education, outreach, and research, with collaborators across Georgia Tech and numerous external organizations in Atlanta and around the world.

"Being named one of the first Interdisciplinary Research Centers is both an honor and an opportunity to further the impact of Georgia Tech in these important areas," said Julie Swann, CHHS co-director and Harold R. and Mary Anne Nash Professor in the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE).

 "The center will provide a unique cross-disciplinary environment that leverages expertise with industry, government agencies, providers, NGOs, and faculty and students from multiple universities, with project and research results leading to transformation in health and humanitarian systems."

While the HHS IRC builds upon the existing HHS Center, the IRC involves more than 30 affiliated faculty and scientists across Georgia Tech from all colleges of the campus and from the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI). CHHS will also become the primary leader on campus in the area of Health Systems, as the former Health Systems Institute (HSi) will now be incorporated into CHHS.

The long-term mission of CHHS is to be a premier research and educational center that advances science and evidence-based approaches to meet the aim of improving population outcomes locally, nationally, and worldwide; reducing per capita costs in the system; and improving opportunities and sustainability of the systems.

"We have many short- to medium-term goals as well," explains Pinar Keskinocak, HHS co-director and William W. George Chair in the Stewart School of ISyE and ADVANCE Professor in the College of Engineering. "In outreach, we want to grow the number of affiliated faculty and scientists from Georgia Tech, bring in new collaborating partners from external organizations, organize several events around campus to build collaborations and knowledge, reach out to Georgia Tech alumni affiliated with health or humanitarian systems, and bring in monetary support to help achieve the aims of the HHS IRC."

CHHS looks forward to working with partners across campus toward providing solutions through advanced technologies, including groups that focus on mobile applications in health care or real-world solutions and training for improved disaster response. CHHS is involved with more than 100 collaborators or participants from outside Georgia Tech and will bring these partners to the table to connect with researchers at Georgia Tech.